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For Educators

Welcome to the Hudson Valley Visual Art Collections Consortium’s Educators Page.

Since the artists later known as the Hudson River School first sketched and painted the Hudson River Valley in the 19th century, the Hudson Valley has been and continues to be the home of some of America’s most innovative artists. Until now, much of the region’s cultural history has been inaccessible to the public except through exhibitions of work that display only a fraction of the artworks created by artists in the region or donated by artists and collectors who also resided here.

To assist you in developing curriculum or researching specific artists, below are instructions for how educators, as well as curators, researchers, and students, can use images and information from our digital collection in their work.

TO CREATE A LIST OF FAVORITE IMAGES:

  • Select an object and click on the image to bring up the object’s information page
  • Click on “Save to Favorites”
  • Repeat to develop a group of favorite images
  • Select “Favorites” from the menu bar at the top of the screen
  • Export these images to create a Powerpoint or other document

TO PRINT OR DOWNLOAD AN IMAGE:

  • Select an object and click on the image to bring up the object’s information page
  • Click on the “Print” or “Download” button above the image and save the image to your computer or workstation

NOTE: If you do not see a Print or Download button on the object information page, this means that the holding institution has not enabled this function.

REFERENCE URLS:

  • A reference URL can be used in Word documents or PDFs to provide a quick link to an image’s information page.

HOW TO PROVIDE APPROPRIATE CREDIT LANGUAGE WHEN YOU USE AN IMAGE IN DOCUMENT:

  • When using an artist’s artwork in a Powerpoint, Word, or other document, it is important to credit the artist whose work you are using. At a minimum, use the following credit information:
    • Name of Artist
    • Name of Artwork
    • Artwork Medium (painting, drawing, print, etc.)
    • Date of Artwork
    • Copyright credit (artist, artwork photographer, or holding institution) *

LESSON PLANS:

  • Lesson plans, courses, or other study aids relating to these collections will be posted here as they are developed.
  • If you develop lesson plans or learning assignments related to one or more artworks on this website, we hope you will share them with us.
  • Copies or links to lesson plans can be shared by contacting one of the holding institutions listed on the website.

* Copyright is a Federal law that protects original works of art and authorship. Creators of art, or copyright holders, have four exclusive rights: To reproduce the work, display the work publicly, prepare derivative works based on the copyrighted work, and distribute copies of the work to the public by sale or loan, and/or to distribute the work to the public. These rights allow the copyright holder to control how and where the image is used by others.

Copyrighted materials can be used on a limited basis for specific purposes without the permission of the copyright holder if it used for nonprofit, educational, scholarly or research purposes. Works of art are generally considered to be under federal copyright for at least the life of the author plus 70 years.  To confirm whether an artwork is under copyright, contact the holding institution.